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My Little Corner of the Net

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Recent Acquisitions

While I have not had much time for miniature projects lately, I have still taken time (usually on my lunch hour) to hit a few estate sales and garage sales  I picked up this Strombecker table for a few bucks.  The rest of the items are mostly accessories.


 Below is close up the smallest basket that I have ever seen.  Its pretty great.  I could not get the picture to rotate, to save my life - just tilt you head.

I came across these smaller scale items at an estate sale - I will display them with my Tootsietoy collection.  They are metal ( possibly lead)  there is a jello mold?, a milk bottle and a leg of meat ( pork?)  My Tootsietoy collection can be seen Here .
I won this Walnut Strombecker table on eBay recently.  I was excited because it came with it's original box.  The table slides open to accept a leaf.  I have one of these already, but this one is in better shape. My Strombecker Walnut furniture can be seen Here .

 I came across these three pieces at an estate sale.  

I believe all three of these items were at that same sale.  A wooden Strombecker bathroom heater, A plaster bathroom scale, and a small red plastic alarm clock.  I will stick the scale with my Hall's collection.  MyHalls Collection can be seen Here .

A brass vase with a removable lid, a blue and white porcelain bowl, a metal coffee cup rack with some spatterware mugs, a brass spittoon and a brass bed warmer.


 I thought this old Websters Dictionary was pretty neat.  It is made from wood and heavy paper.  Does anyone have an idea how old this might be?
 I picked up this small scale metal train.  I will probably paint the plastic wheels.

 The last two items are a butter church and a plate of fruit.  Who doesn't need a butter churn in their miniature collection?

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

St. Louis City Museum

After Union Station we spent part of a day at the St. Louis City Museum. Every turn offers a new adventure in this place.  There is so much to take in, to see and to do.  I went a little crazy with the photos - enjoy!
 This model of a city has a great model train.  The large metal "cage" is part of a huge system of tubes for visitors to climb around and experience the museum.

 The museum is an old 10 story shoe factory that has been re-purposed as a giant playground for both youngsters and adults.  Every turn and room is a new adventure.  Slides, tunnels and lots of salvaged pieces.  
 Here is a view from the lobby. 
 The columns in the lobby are covered with gears and glass marbles.  They were very beautiful.
 Outside, the parking lot is surrounded by a giant concrete and steel "snake" fence.
 Here is a closer view of the snake


The adventure and tubes and slides continue outside - notice the real fire engine and the school bus on the roof!


 This column reminded me of Kathi at Beautiful Mini Blessings
- it was covered in a mosaic made from real sea shells.



 This facade was salvaged from a building and rebuilt as the entrance to the temporary exhibits.
 I liked this stonework salvaged from another building.
 This wall was covered entirely of old newspaper printing press plates.
 The bathroom walls on the first level were constructed out of stainless steel buffet pans.

 This was part of the gift shop - it too was constructed with salvaged pieces.
 The aquarium had life size fantasy see creatures, more tunnels and a great ceiling covered in strips of fabric.
 Some of the tile mosaics were really creative
 Part of the museum had this old cabin which had been re-located from a farm outside of town.
 The cabin now serves as a milkshake bar!  I liked the diagonal patterns in the chinking.
 More cool tile work
 There was a huge vault and safe deposit boxes that had been salvaged from a local bank.
My wife was reminded of her childhood and the Big Boy Restaurant chain.  I joked that I was her other "Big Boy"
  It really makes you feel like a kid again.  Which we all need once and a while.  I suspect that is part of the reason we escape to our miniatures too.